Athens and Jerusalem Once More: What the Turn to Virtue Means for Theological Exegesis

Bibliographic Information: 

Pardue, Stephen. "Athens and Jerusalem Once More: What the Turn to Virtue Means for Theological Exegesis." Journal of Theological Interpretation 4 (2010): 295–308.

Description

This essay explores the concept of interpretive virtue and to elucidate its significance for contemporary exegetes. While several recent works have referenced the importance of the virtues in renewing biblical interpretation, a concise account of the options, benefits, and challenges associated with such a move remains elusive. To sketch such an account, this essay explores virtue epistemology as an analogous (but not identical) trend in a sister discipline.

Two models of virtue epistemology—the first from Linda Zagzebski, and the second from Robert C. Roberts and W. Jay Wood—offer several insights that should inform appropriations of virtue ethics in biblical interpretation.While there are surely important differences between epistemology and exegesis, Roberts and Wood in particular demonstrate the great potential that lies in a virtues approach to biblical interpretation that aims at improving the intellectual life by forming habits conducive to the acquisition of various interpretive goods.

Publisher: 
Eisenbrauns