True Myth: C. S. Lewis and Joseph Campbell on the Veracity of Christianity

Bibliographic Information: 

Menzies, James. True Myth: C. S. Lewis and Joseph Campbell on the Veracity of Christianity. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2014.

Description:

Each generation asks in its own way, ''What does it mean to be human?'' In True Myth, James Menzies addresses this question by exploring myth and religion in the thinking of mythologist Joseph Campbell and Oxford don C. S. Lewis.

Joseph Campbell understood Christianity as comprised of mythical themes similar to those in other religious and secular myths. Admitting that certain portions of the biblical record are historical, he taught the theological and miraculous aspects as symbolic, as stories in which the reader discovers what it means to be human today.

C. S. Lewis defined Christianity, and being truly human, as a relationship between the personal Creator and his creation mediated through faith in his son, Jesus Christ. In contrast to Campbell, Lewis took the theological and miraculous literally. Although Lewis understood how one could see symbolism and lessons for life in miraculous events, he believed they were more than symbolic and indeed took place in human history.

Not only does Menzies consider the ways Campbell and Lewis utilize myth in answering the question for their generation, but he also probes the influence and presence of myth in philosophy, media, ethics, history, literature, art, music, and religion in a contemporary context, thus helping readers consider answers for their own age.

Publisher: 
Wipf & Stock